Solid Eearth Science Working Group HomeAbout UsSolid Eearth Science Working Group ReportSummaryIntegrated ProgramEducationLinks

 

AN INTEGRATED PROGRAM FOR SOLID EARTH SCIENCE

 

 

GlobeTo make substantial progress toward answering each of the six challenges for solid-Earth science, NASA must formulate a broadly conceived program with both near-term goals and clear steps toward longer-term objectives. A fully realized program contains elements that encompass all of the following aspects:

  • Observational Strategies

By weaving each of these essential elements into an integrated program architecture, the long-term goals of understanding the solid Earth and achieving predictive capabilities can be attained. NASA's role in observations is primarily the development of satellite missions, but such projects cannot be as effective as possible without complementary terrestrial observations and the requisite partnerships with other programs and agencies.

Understanding the solid Earth and moving toward predictive capabilities where appropriate requires a broad observational strategy, incorporating numerous methodologies (including spaceborne and ground measurements), technological advances, and complementarity among observations. The SESWG recommends these seven observational strategies to address the fundamental solid-Earth questions that frame this report.

A dedicated research and analysis program is a critically important core activity, to ensure that newly acquired data are fully analyzed, to provide the new ideas for instrument and mission development, and to foster unexpected scientific discoveries. This effort should include significant investments in computation and modeling for testing theories and predictions. A number of observations needed over the next two and a half decades require a continuing investment in advanced technology development. This modular yet broadly interlinked program architecture offers flexibility to change as scientific discoveries and programmatic requirements dictate.

 
   
Back to Solid Earth Science Home Site credits

Webpage last updated: